Cranial Electro Stimulation Pioneer

Dr Meg PattersonIn 1993 a significant article was published in the journal, Subtle Energies by Dr. Meg Patterson—a true pioneer for Cranial Electro Stimulation. Bob Beck always gave Meg Patterson credit for her role in bringing CES to North America. When summing up her research in “Neuroelectric Therapy (NET) in Addiction Detoxification,” she said:

After two decades of reported clinical and investigative work, NET has been demonstrated to be a safe and highly effective alternative to the restricted unsatisfactory pharmacological approach to detoxifying addicts. NET promotes and expedites the rapid return of the normal physiological functions and psychological stability which enhances the addicts’ ability to benefit from relapse prevention programs.

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Pioneering Scientists Interviewed about CES

MegaBrain ReportIn April 1990 the first issue of Michael Hutchison’s “MEGABRAIN REPORT, The Psychotechnology Newsletter” was published. The issue featured “High Voltage: The Bioelectric Interviews” about Cranial Electro Stimulation. The three scientists interviewed were all prominent for their leading-edge research in electromedicine. Robert “Bob” Beck B.E., D.Sc., Robert O. Becker M.D. and Daniel L. Kirch, Ph.D. were each interviewed about CES. In the same issue, Bob Beck was also included in a discussion of Scalar Waves with Eldon Byrd, Ph.D., Peter Lindemann and Glen Rein, Ph.D.

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What about Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)?

Brain Boost“How a gentle electrical jolt can focus a sluggish mind” featured Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on a PBS News Hour on March 31, 2015. How does tDCS compare with Cranial Electro Stimulation (CES)? The technology does not include frequencies as used in CES devices. Without key frequencies, it has a more limited use compared to the more global results produced by CES.

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“Cranial Electrical Stimulation Potential Use in Reducing Sleep and Mood Disturbances in Persons with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers”

ces-calmWith stress from lack of sleep as well as with the day-to-day demands of dealing with severe dementia, the objective of the research was to review “The proposed mechanism of action and studies that support cranial electrical stimulation as a modality to reduce distressing symptoms ….

January 2010

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Presentation on CES to the Food and Drug Administration in the US

BrainWhile Cranial Electro Stimulation devices are licensed in the US, they are only available by prescription. When dealing with CES technology since the 1980s, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shown a reluctance to recognize the large body of research that has consistently been presented.

A presentation titled “Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Presentation to FDA Neurology Panel, February 2012” sums up the considerable body of CES research.

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Quick Recovery from Addiction brings Awareness of CES

Back in January 1983, Omni magazine featured an article by Kathleen McAuliffe simply titled “Brain Tuner” about rock superstar Peter Townshend—not about his career but rather about his remarkable recovery from a severe addiction. His recovery was news as he had been treated with a simple frequency device that had taken away his cravings without any withdrawal symptoms. The hero was Dr. Meg Patterson using her Cranial Electro Stimulation (CES) device that was dubbed “The Black Box.”

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Applying Healing Frequencies to the Vagus Nerve

Scientists are conducting research to apply microcurrents to improve health—especially by applying the current to the vagus nerve. The vagus is the major highway of the nervous system with branches that penetrate most organs including the heart and stomach. Researchers at the University of Leeds in the UK are applying the microcurrents non-invasively by attaching electrodes to the tragus, an area of the outer ear to reach the vagus nerve.

One of the researchers, professor Jim Deuchars says,

“we think it does have potential to improve the health of the heart and might even become part of the treatment for heart failure.”

‘Tickling’ your ear could be good for your heart.” Posted in August 2014.

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Widespread Health Benefits Using Electricity

Research using gentle levels of electricity to heal is on the rise. No less than 14 different studies published in medical journals are tagged to a Science News article published in November 2015.

The studies revolve around the electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve. “With outposts in nearly every organ and a direct line into the brain stem, the vagus nerve is the nervous system’s superhighway.” Research stimulating this far-reaching nerve is showing benefit to reduce headaches, epilepsy, depression, diabetes, improve heart function, and more.

“Viva vagus: Wandering nerve could lead to range of therapies”

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